Battle of the Granicus

The Greeks crossed the Granique, which closed the entrance to Asia, despite the trunks of trees gathered on the banks of the river
The Greeks crossed the Granique, which closed the entrance to Asia, despite the trunks of trees gathered on the banks of the river

Historical Context

Alexander the Great was one of the most successful conquerors in human history, who took his Macedonian Empire from the shores of Greece to the borders of India.

Part of this conquest included the destruction and subjugation of the Persian Empire, the great arch-nemesis of the Greek states. As he was expanding eastward, Alexander would have three major battles with the Persians, and the first was at the crossing of the Granicus River in 334 BC.

The Greeks lost around 300 to 400 men and the Persians up to 4,000, mostly as they retreated from the battle. Many Greek mercenaries who fought for the Persians were captured and enslaved, sent to till the oil of Macedon as punishment for perceived treason.

Alexander would remain undefeated in battle until his death in 323 BC, by which time he had constructed one of the largest empires in Ancient history and forged a reputation for being one of the most successful military commanders ever.

Painting Info


Location painted: Granicus River, Turkey

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