Casablanca Conference

Henri Giraud, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles de Gaulle and Winston Churchill at the Casablanca Conference
Henri Giraud, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles de Gaulle and Winston Churchill at the Casablanca Conference

Historical Context

Between January 14 and 23, the leaders of most of the Allied forces most significant members (excluding Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, who had declined to attend on account of the ongoing Battle of Stalingrad) met in the Anfa Hotel in Casablanca, Morocco, the city made famous the year before in the 1942 film starring Humphrey Bogart (though this isn't the reason they chose to meet there.)

The Allies held many major conferences during the war, including Yalta, Tehran, Malta and Potsdam. Casablanca, attended by Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the leaders of Free France represented by Charles de Gaulle and Henri Giraud discussed various topics of importance, including the invasion of Europe, logistical issues and the make-up of North Africa after the war.

Roosevelt lobbied for a cross-channel invasion but the decision was eventually made to instead invade Italy, deferring the Normandy landings for another year. The decision to invade France in 1944 was taken at the Trident Conference in Washington a few months later.

Perhaps the most famous aspect of the conference came with the decision that the Allies would fight until the Axis powers had been forced into an "unconditional surrender", i.e. their total defeat.

Photo Info


Photographer: Unknown
Location taken: Casablanca, Morocco

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica

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