Venus de Milo

Aphrodite of Milos, or better known as Venus de Milo
Aphrodite of Milos, or better known as Venus de Milo

Historical Context

One of the star attractions, along with the Mona Lisa, of the Louvre Museum in Paris. The Venus de Milo, named after the island where she was rediscovered in 1820, is thought to have been made by the sculptor Alexandros of Antioch in the 2nd century BC.

Although most often held to be a depiction of Aphrodite, the ancient goddess of Love, she may also be Amphitrite, the Greek goddess of the sea. Carved in two main sections in the Hellenistic style, the statue is famous for its missing arms in addition to its beauty.

Photo Info


Location taken: Milos, South Aegean, Greece

Related Events

  • 1820-04-08 The famous ancient Greek statue, Venus de Milo is discovered on the Aegean island of Milos

Historical Photos